Lion News

+documenttags:hazmat +documenttags:labels

07/22/2015

GHS Labels for Tanker Trucks and Rail Tank Cars

Under OSHA’s “HazCom 2012” Standard (HCS), mandatory for chemical manufacturers, processors, and distributors as of June 1, 2015, containers of hazardous chemicals must display new labels and pictograms...

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07/21/2015

New Lithium Battery Shipping Rules Mandatory August 7

On August 6, 2014, PHMSA updated the lithium battery shipping provisions of the Hazardous Material Regulations (HMR; 49 CFR 171-180). The new lithium battery shipping rules more completely harmonize the US regulations with evolving international standards. While some dicrepancies remain, domestic and international rules for shipping lithium batteries are now more similar than ever...

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05/05/2015

GHS Deadline Is Less Than 30 Days Away

In 2012, the United States Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) promulgated final amendments to the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS), to harmonize it with the United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification & Labeling of Chemicals (GHS)... 

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01/09/2015

IATA Addendum to 56th Ed. DGR

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has posted the first addendum to its 56th Edition Dangerous Goods Regulations. Published annually, the DGR is the major text followed by hazmat air shippers worldwide. US shippers must comply with the latest edition of IATA's regulations in addition to complying with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) Hazardous Materials Regulations...

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08/21/2014

Significant Changes to IATA’s 56th Edition DGR

This fall, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) will publish the 56th Edition of its Dangerous Goods Regulations. Compliance with the 56th edition DGR is mandatory starting January 1, 2015. To help shippers stay up-to-date with the latest hazmat air shipping rules, below is a summary of major changes that will appear in IATA’s forthcoming edition...

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08/19/2014

How Small Is Too Small for Hazmat Markings?

In 2013, domestic and international regulatory agencies (DOT, IATA, and IMO) implemented regulations to standardize the size of markings on packages of hazmat. Standardization across national borders, modes of transportation, and industry sectors streamlines compliance, reduces confusion, and increases the safety, security, and efficiency of international hazmat transportation. During this process, the one element that...

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05/20/2014

Don’t Get Burned: Shipping Elevated-temperature Materials

Don't Get Burned Shipping Elevated-temperature Materials 
 
In the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR), the US DOT sets specific requirements for elevated-temperature materials. Simply put, these are materials shipped at high temperatures. Common examples of elevated-temperature materials include asphalt and roofing tar...

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06/18/2013

Labeling Small Limited Quantity Shipments

Over the next few years, the Department of Transportation is phasing out the old ORM-D classification for consumer commodities and replacing it with an expanded universe of limited quantity authorizations. In most cases, the only difference for the end-user will be...

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03/19/2013

DOT Basic Descriptions: Shipping Papers vs. Marks and Labels

A common question raised in Lion’s hazmat workshops lately is how the DOT’s recent change to the order of elements for basic descriptions will affect marking and labeling procedures for packages. Read on for answers to this common question and a refresher on the package marking and labeling requirements...

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07/31/2012

New GHS Labels vs. DOT Labels

Q. I have a 55-gallon drum of a flammable chemical that I plan to ship to a customer. I know I am required to have a GHS label on the outside, as well as DOT markings and labels. I was told that the flame pictogram on the GHS label cannot be on the drum since there is already a Flammable Liquid label as required by the DOT. Is this true...

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