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How OSHA’s General Duty Clause Affects Your Workplace

Posted on 1/5/2016 by Lion Technology, Inc.

OSHA's General Duty Clause (GDC) is a cornerstone of work safety regulations in the United States. Found in Section 5(a)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, or OSH Act, the General Duty Clause lays out the basic responsibility of the employer to protect employees from the hazards present in the workplace.

In 2015, OSHA inspectors issued over 1,500 citations for violations of the General Duty Clause. Understanding your responsibilities under this crucial piece of the OSH Act is critical to avoid workplace incidents, lost productivity, and costly penalties from the Department of Labor.

employer safety responsibilities under the OSH Act of 1970

The General Duty Clause states:

"Each employer-
  1. shall furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees;
  2. shall comply with occupational safety and health standards promulgated under this Act"
And that:

"Each employee shall comply with occupational safety and health standards and all rules, regulations, and orders issued pursuant to this Act which are applicable to his own actions and conduct."

There's not much in the way of specific requirements in the law, but its overall meaning applies to nearly every decision employers and safety managers make. Let's unpack some of it.

Employer Responsibilities Under OSHA's General Duty Clause

Each employer (subject to the OSH Act) must provide to all employees a safe place of employment. A safe place of employment is one that is free of (1) recognized (2) serious hazards.

What Are "Recognized" Workplace Hazards?

OSHA considers a hazard to be recognized if the employer knew (or provably should have known) of its existence due to previous incidents, employee complaints, previous failures to correct, industry standards, or if the legally abstract 'reasonable person' would have recognized it as a hazard.

What Are "Serious" Workplace Hazards?

Serious hazards are those that could cause death, or "serious physical harm." OSHA describes serious physical harm in its Field Operations Manual to include the following injuries; amputations, concussion, other serious impairment (temporary or permanent, chronic or acute) of any part of the body, crushing injuries and bone fractures, burns (from any source and including scalds), and lacerations of any kind involving significant bleeding and/or requiring suturing, sprains, strains, and musculoskeletal disorders.

Serious physical harm also includes illnesses such as cancer, poisoning, chronic respiratory illness (silicosis, asbestosis, byssinosis, etc.), hearing and/or visual impairment, and impairment of the central nervous system.


Common Hazards Cited Under OSHA's General Duty Clause

If you look at OSHA's index of Safety and Health Topics, you'll see over 150 workplace hazards. OSHA issues a number of citations under the General Duty Clause for hazards not necessarily covered by a specific OSHA work safety Standard. Recognized hazards for which OSHA regularly cites employers under the GDC include:
  • Environmental hazards (extreme heat and cold, extreme weather events)
  • Workplace violence
  • Ergonomics and musculoskeletal disorders
  • Combustible dust in a variety of locations
  • Particular types of equipment (lasers, nail guns, pressure vessels, ammonia refrigeration systems)
How Does the General Duty Clause Protect Employees?

Even with unlimited time, budget, and motivation, OSHA could not issue effective Standards to cover each and every workplace hazard that exists. It is the employer's obligation to minimize or mitigate serious hazards whether or not OSHA has issued a formal set of rules (a Standard) for dealing with that specific hazard. The GDC ensures that employers protect employees from reconigzed hazards even when a specific Standard is not in place. 

Interactive, Engaging Online OSHA Training

For convenient training that holds employees' attention and helps them protect themselves and their co-workers from the hazards in your workplace, Lion offers a full suite of OSHA online courses. Be sure you're employees are aware of the common hazards in general industry sites with the 10 Hour OSHA General Industry online course. Or train employees on specific OSHA standards like GHS hazard communication [29 CFR 1910.1200(h)] or bloodborne pathogens [29 CFR 1910.1030].
 

Tags: OSH Act, workplace safety

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