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07/21/2016

EPA Updates EPCRA Chemical Reporting to Match GHS HazCom

When it comes to overlapping chemical requirements, major changes tend to reverberate across many environmental and safety programs.

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05/31/2016

What EHS Pros Should Know for Summer 2016

Summer 2016 will bring major changes for hazmat shippers, hazardous waste professionals, and safety managers nationwide. Below is a quick snapshot of some major compliance updates, deadlines, and new rulemakings to be aware of now that beach season is officially underway!

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05/06/2016

Who's Responsible for Training Temp Workers on GHS?

The work may be temporary, but the effects of an employee getting hurt or sick on the job can last a lifetime. OSHA’s safety standards for industry put the onus of ensuring worker safety on the employer. For temporary workers, this raises a unique question—who, exactly, “employs” these workers? Is it the staffing agency or the host business? And who is responsible for training temporary workers on safety issues like GHS hazard communication?

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05/03/2016

Almost There: Final GHS Deadline—June 1

Can you believe it’s been four years since OSHA’s revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS, or HazCom) took effect? Since May 2012, manufacturers, suppliers, and employers have contended with several implementation deadlines. If you work in the business of chemical manufacturing, distribution, import, or handling, by now you should be well versed in the workplace changes resulting from the revised 2012 Hazard Communication standard (HCS 2012)...

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03/23/2016

No GHS Labels? You Have Options.

Under the revised HazCom Standard, also known as HazCom 2012, OSHA requires all workplace containers of hazardous chemicals to be labeled according to new criteria to protect employees. GHS hazard labels must also appear on all shipped containers, making it crucial that distributors understand the requirements and are prepared to comply. 

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