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Lion News

+documenttags:hazard +documenttags:communication

03/07/2017

OSHA Releases New GHS Enforcement Memo

In a memo aimed at field staff who perform workplace safety inspections, issued in September but posted to OSHA’s website recently, OSHA provides useful guidance for chemical industry professionals tasked with maintaining compliance with the updated GHS Hazard Communication Standard, or 2012 HCS.

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09/26/2016

Proposed Changes to TSCA SNUR Rules for Chemical Manufacturers

US EPA has proposed changes to the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) chemical reporting requirements intended in part to align the TSCA rules with OSHA’s Hazard Communication, or “HazCom,” Standard (HCS) and other best safety practices.

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09/06/2016

Choosing the Right OSHA Safety Signs

Most safety professionals are familiar with OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) at 29 CFR 1910.1200 for container labels and Safety Data Sheets. But the HCS doesn’t cover everything. Across a typical facility, signs of all shapes, sizes, and colors communicate different hazards to workers. Did you know that many of these safety signs and tags also must meet specific OSHA requirements for communicating biological, mechanical, and other physical hazards?

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07/21/2016

EPA Updates EPCRA Chemical Reporting to Match GHS HazCom

When it comes to overlapping chemical requirements, major changes tend to reverberate across many environmental and safety programs.

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05/31/2016

What EHS Pros Should Know for Summer 2016

Summer 2016 will bring major changes for hazmat shippers, hazardous waste professionals, and safety managers nationwide. Below is a quick snapshot of some major compliance updates, deadlines, and new rulemakings to be aware of now that beach season is officially underway!

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05/06/2016

Who's Responsible for Training Temp Workers on GHS?

The work may be temporary, but the effects of an employee getting hurt or sick on the job can last a lifetime. OSHA’s safety standards for industry put the onus of ensuring worker safety on the employer. For temporary workers, this raises a unique question—who, exactly, “employs” these workers? Is it the staffing agency or the host business? And who is responsible for training temporary workers on safety issues like GHS hazard communication?

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05/03/2016

Almost There: Final GHS Deadline—June 1

Can you believe it’s been four years since OSHA’s revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS, or HazCom) took effect? Since May 2012, manufacturers, suppliers, and employers have contended with several implementation deadlines. If you work in the business of chemical manufacturing, distribution, import, or handling, by now you should be well versed in the workplace changes resulting from the revised 2012 Hazard Communication standard (HCS 2012)...

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03/23/2016

No GHS Labels? You Have Options.

Under the revised HazCom Standard, also known as HazCom 2012, OSHA requires all workplace containers of hazardous chemicals to be labeled according to new criteria to protect employees. GHS hazard labels must also appear on all shipped containers, making it crucial that distributors understand the requirements and are prepared to comply. 

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10/07/2015

Top 10 Most Cited OSHA Violations in FY 2015

At the recent National Safety Council (NSC) Congress & Expo in Atlanta, OSHA released its list of the Top 10 most frequently cited workplace safety violations. See the list below. We’ve indicated each OSHA standard’s spot on last year’s Top 10 violations list after each entry. As you will see, the list did not change much...

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Minimizing the amount of hazardous waste your site generates can have tremendous benefits—from cost savings to decreased risk of spills, releases, and injury. This guide covers basic “source reduction” strategies to prevent unused chemicals from becoming regulated as hazardous waste.

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