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09/19/2016

TSCA CDR Reporting Deadline Extended to October 31

US EPA has announced it will extend the deadline for chemical manufacturers, importers, and processors who must report chemical data under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) from September 30 to October 31, 2016.

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09/13/2016

TSCA CDR Reports Due September 30!

Update 09/19/16: US EPA has extended the deadline for submitting TSCA Chemical Data Reports from September 30 to October 31, 2016. The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to collect information from chemical manufacturers and importers via the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) program...

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06/30/2016

EPA Releases Timeline for Implementing New Chemical Law

US EPA has released a first-year implementation plan for new and revised chemical testing and management requirements under the recently signed Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act.

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06/14/2016

Your New TSCA Rules Breakdown

Earlier this month, both chambers of the US Congress passed a long awaited reform bill to re-work the nation's premier chemical law, the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). With the "new" TSCA now set to become law, it's time to take look at exactly what Congress passed, and what new regulations chemical manufacturers, importers, and processors should expect EPA to create to enact new requirements in the law.

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06/09/2016

$23,000 PCB Storage Penalty for Lamp Recycler Under TSCA

According to a US EPA press release, a lamp recycler in Windsor, CT will pay $23,000 to settle allegations personnel mishandled PCB-containing light ballasts. PCBs—polychlorinated biphenyls—are  known carcinogens subject to specific handling and management rules under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

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06/08/2016

TSCA Reform Passes Senate, Awaits POTUS Signature

After passing the House of Representatives last week, long-awaited revisions to the United States’ major chemical management, reporting, and recordkeeping law—the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)—have now passed the Senate as well.  Named the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act, the revisions to TSCA now require only a signature from the President to enact them into Federal law.

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05/26/2016

TSCA Reform Passes US House 403-12

The US House of Representatives approved legislation this week to overhaul the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) chemical management, reporting, and recordkeeping regulations. The nearly unanimous decision to pass TSCA reform in the House (the Bill passed 403 to 12) comes after lawmakers agreed on key points of the legislation earlier this month. The Senate is expected to follow suit and pass the bill as well.

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05/11/2016

Lawmakers Agree on Key Points of TSCA Reform

Sources in Washington D.C. are reporting that two key lawmakers have reached an agreement on “key sticking points” of a bill to reform the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the USA’s forty-year-old chemical safety law.

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03/08/2016

Navigating TSCA Rules for Specific Chemicals

The Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) authorizes US EPA to require chemical manufacturers, importers, and processers to monitor and report on their activities once every four years. This year, 2016, is an important year for facilities subject to TSCA—it’s the first year in which new, broader chemical data reporting requirements take effect...

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02/12/2016

EPA Issues New TSCA Significant New Use Rules for 3 Chemical Substances

In a today’s Federal Register, US EPA finalized Significant New Use Rules for three chemical substances. The specific chemical substances covered in this EPA Final Rule are three very long chain chlorinated paraffins (vLCCPs) substances covered under PMNs P-12-539, P-13-107, and P-13-109. 

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