Lion News

+documenttags:IMDG

08/15/2016

What’s New for the 2016 IMDG Code?

Published once every two years by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code) is the compliance manual used by the world’s hazmat vessel shippers and ocean carriers...

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07/19/2016

August Hazmat Shipper Workshops in Atlanta, Charlotte, Orlando, and more!

To help shippers meet US DOT training mandates, protect personnel, and maintain full compliance with the latest rules, Lion will present the Complete Multimodal Hazmat Shipper Certification Workshops in southeast US cities starting next week. 

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05/04/2016

Coast Guard Declares Equivalency With SOLAS Container Weight Rules

Last year, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) amended the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) regulations to require that vessel shippers verify container gross mass for all vessel shipments before they can be loaded onto a ship.

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12/15/2015

IMDG Code: What You Need to Know

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code, or IMDG Code, is the international standard for packing and shipping hazardous materials by vessel. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) creates and maintains the IMDG Code requirements. The IMO is a specialized agency of the United Nations. Hazmat vessel shippers in the US should be aware that these vessel shipping rules include unique requirements not found in the US DOT's 49 CFR Hazardous Materials Regulations...

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09/15/2015

Shipping Hazmat Limited Quantities by Ground, Air, and Vessel

When shipped by ground, air, or vessel, small quantities of hazardous materials (or dangerous goods)—referred to as "limited quantities"—are granted relief from certain hazmat shipping requirements.

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08/18/2015

Protect Your Package: Hazmat and the Rigors of Transport

While hazardous materials pose certain risks when stored and used in a warehouse or manufacturing environment, the risks are greatly amplified when hazmat is put in motion along the supply chain. Every day, hazardous materials (known internationally as dangerous goods) are transported in 18-wheelers and tanker trucks on roads and highways, aboard freight and passenger airplanes, and in shipping containers on the open seas...

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04/21/2015

Challenges for IMDG Hazmat Shipping Papers

In most cases, hazmat/dangerous goods shipments must be accompanied by a shipping paper when transported by ground, air, vessel, or rail. While the US DOT oversees all domestic hazmat shipments, the 49 CFR Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) authorize shippers to follow the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code when offering hazmat for vessel transport...

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01/06/2015

DOT’s HM 215M Hazmat Harmonization Rule

Every two years, the US Department of Transportation (DOT) revises its Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to harmonize them with changing international standards from the UN Model Regulations, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Technical Instructions, and the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code...

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12/16/2014

Placarding Hazmat Vessel Shipments

Transporting materials by vessel is a dangerous business. Incidents are not uncommon and can threaten the cargo and crew. Rogue waves and human error can be a hazard in themselves; adding dangerous goods to the mix can be a recipe for disaster. Identifying dangerous goods and communicating their hazards to port and vessel personnel is vital...

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08/19/2014

How Small Is Too Small for Hazmat Markings?

In 2013, domestic and international regulatory agencies (DOT, IATA, and IMO) implemented regulations to standardize the size of markings on packages of hazmat. Standardization across national borders, modes of transportation, and industry sectors streamlines compliance, reduces confusion, and increases the safety, security, and efficiency of international hazmat transportation. During this process, the one element that...

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When US EPA introduced the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the hazardous waste management standards included reduced requirements for some large-volume wastes. After studying the hazards of wastes in oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations, as directed by the US Congress, EPA determined regulation of these wastes under RCRA was not warranted. Therefore, many oil and gas E&P wastes are excluded from the RCRA Subtitle C hazardous waste management standards.

Understanding the RCRA Exclusion for Oil and Gas

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