Lion News

+documenttags:recycling

05/26/2015

Tips for Managing Commercial Chemical Products

At manufacturing and industry sites, commercial chemical products (CCPs) like degreasers, cleaning products, solvents, acids, and more are often crucial to production. When these products are abandoned, though, property damage and harm to employees can result from leaks, spills, volatilization, fires, or explosions. Because of these dangers, abandoned CCPs are regulated as solid waste under US EPA rules...

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04/15/2015

EPA Removes Major Exclusions from RCRA

On April 8, 2015, US EPA made two significant revisions to its Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The revisions—related to the comparable fuels and gasification rules—are effective immediately...

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02/24/2015

Recycling, Reusing, and Reclaiming Hazardous Waste

EPA's new Definition of Solid Waste Final Rule makes major changes to the recycling provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Understanding the requirements for recycling, reusing, and reclaiming your site's hazardous waste is critical, especially for EHS and shipping professionals who sign the Hazardous Waste Manifest...

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12/24/2014

EPA’s New Definition of Solid Waste Rule

On December 10, 2014, US EPA signed a Final Rule to revise many of the recycling provisions associated with the “definition of solid waste” (DSW). The long-awaited Final Rule revises the exclusions from RCRA for recycled/recyclable hazardous secondary materials that were added to the hazardous waste regulations in 2008... 

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03/25/2014

Reusing Waste and Avoiding Sham Recycling

To encourage recycling and keep more hazardous waste out of landfills and the ecosystem, the US EPA established the “reuse relief” in its hazardous waste regulations. The relief, found at 40 CFR 261.2(e), excludes certain materials from the definition of solid waste when they are reused in a beneficial way. In general, the exclusion applies when an otherwise hazardous waste is reused in one of three ways...

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10/22/2013

Cutting Costs With Life Cycle Assessment

Life Cycle Assessment is a critical tool for organizations seeking ways to reduce their environmental impact, manage waste more efficiently, and reduce compliance costs. Also called life cycle analysis or “cradle-to-grave” analysis, a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is designed to gauge how a product will impact the environment throughout its life—from the initial sourcing of raw materials to eventual waste disposal...

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02/26/2013

Managing Hazardous Waste as Used Oil

In general, the EPA does not consider used oils to be hazardous waste. In establishing proper management standards for these wastes, the EPA presumed that recycling, from re-refining to burning as fuel, would occur. The used oil rules at 40 CFR 279 are less burdensome than the hazardous waste regulations (40 CFR 260-270). In some circumstances, the EPA even allows...

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11/27/2012

How to Avoid Speculative Accumulation

Recycling hazardous waste is a great way to save the planet and your bottom line. The RCRA regulations include many provisions under which hazardous wastes can be legitimately recycled scattered throughout 40 CFR Part 261, Subpart A. When you recycle hazardous waste, you are exempt from the following regulations that apply to hazardous waste...

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10/23/2012

Precious Metals Recycling

Hazardous wastes that contain economically significant amounts of precious metals are excluded from RCRA when reclaimed, regardless of their other properties. A few rules still apply. They can be found at 40 CFR 266, Subpart F.
 
The U.S. EPA considers the following materials to be “precious metals”...

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09/25/2012

RCRA Options for Recycling Waste Lead-acid Batteries

Although lead-acid batteries generally exhibit the hazardous waste characteristic of toxicity for lead (D008) and would be subject to significant restrictions when discarded, the EPA encourages their recycling by providing two alternative management standards. Lead-acid batteries may be managed as “universal waste” under 40 CFR Part 273 or under the specific alternative standards of...

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download our latest whitepaper

Minimizing the amount of hazardous waste your site generates can have tremendous benefits—from cost savings to decreased risk of spills, releases, and injury. This guide covers basic “source reduction” strategies to prevent unused chemicals from becoming regulated as hazardous waste.

3 Tips for Hazardous Waste Source Reduction

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