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OSHA Seeks Industry Input on Forklift Safety Standard

Posted on 3/12/2019 by Roger Marks

OSHA is seeking industry’s input on its Powered Industrial Truck (Forklifts) Standard. In a Request for Information (RFI) published to the Federal Register on March 11, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration requests information and comments about the requirements for forklifts and other trucks under the general industry, maritime, and construction Standards.

OSHA wants to know more about:
  • The type, age, and use of powered industrial trucks in industry
  • Maintenance and retrofitting of powered industrial trucks
  • How OSHA should regulate older powered industrial trucks
  • The types of accidents and injuries associated with powered industrial trucks; and
  • The cost and benefits of retrofitting PITs with safety features

In addition, OSHA requests comment on whether the differences between its maritime, construction, and general industry Standards are appropriate and effective for each industrial sector.

See the RFI in the Federal Register here. 

In November 2018, Lion News reported OSHA’s plans to update the forklifts safety Standard and the Lockout/Tagout Standard in 2019. OSHA’s current forklift safety standards are based on ANSI standards released in 1969, were promulgated in 1971, and were updated only one time—in 1998.

Since updating the Standard in 1998, OSHA has issued two interpretations of the forklift regulations, in 1999 and 2004.

More Than Forklifts

OSHA defines powered industrial trucks as vehicles:

  • Controlled by a riding operator, or
  • Remotely controlled, or
  • Controlled by an operate standing alongside
In addition to the typical forklift, the powered industrial truck regulations can apply to vehicles like powered pallet jacks, shopping cart caddies, order pickers, and other similar machines.

OSHA commonly lists forklift accidents as one of the top ten workplace health and safety concerns in the US each year. By providing effective forklift safety training, employers can protect forklift operators and other employees from injury on the job. Employees with proper training are prepared to safely operate and maintain these lifts and avoid accidents.
 
To help forklift drivers meet OSHA’s formal instruction requirement at 29 CFR 1910.178(I), Lion Technology provides the Forklift Safety Online Course. Available 24/7, this online course teaches the principles for operating forklifts; using safety equipment; loading, balancing, and lifting loads; inspecting and maintaining lifts; parking; and refueling/recharging safely.

Tags: forklift, forklifts, osha, safety, training, worker safety

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